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Academic Writing Center


Our goal at the Academic Writing Center is to guide scientists at all stages in their careers toward a global improvement in writing skills rather than simply producing better papers. In working with PhD students in the earliest stages of their PhDs, we hope to demystify the ubiquitous ‘native English speaker’ in the teaching and publishing process and cultivate the ‘Writerly Ear’ within, a skill that will continue to serve students as they advance in their scientific careers. Not just students, but also faculty are taught how to prepare to deliver their courses in English, through specific training in pedagogy & communications skills adapted to international learning environments. Researchers are coached on public speaking skills in preparation for conferences. Whether through one of our training courses or our one-to-one sessions, each activity is a personalised exchange that focuses on skill-building towards full autonomy.


The Academic Writing Center offre à la communauté scientifique de l'Université Paris-Saclay un service interne de relecture et de coaching pour les publications académiques.

Individual consultations are available for Des consultations individuelles sont disponibles pour des
  • Article Reviews
  • Révisions d'articles
  • Teacher Development Consultations (Course Design & Delivery in English)
  • Consultations sur le développement des enseignants (conception et diffusion de cours en anglais)
  • Professional Portfolios (CVs, LinkedIn Profiles)
  • Portfolios professionnels (CVs, profils LinkedIn)
  • Entrepreneurial Packages in English (Pitches, Website Proofing)
  • Packages entrepreneuriaux en anglais (Pitches, Website Proofing)

Powerpoint slides from the informatoinal meeting in November are here:

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. For more information on the competition itself, click here.

When you sign up for our proofreading services, you can be sure that we will go over your entire document, starting from its title to the very last sentence. Our language coaches usually proofread a 20-page publication in 6-8 sessions with each participant. This steady pace implies that your article is already formatted and pre-corrected with Grammarly, an online grammar check tool. Any proofreading session for a text that has not been previously processed by Grammarly will be cancelled.

If you don't have a Grammarly account yet, please request one here: https://tinyurl.com/awc-grammarly

This Premiun account is offered freely to all PhD students, researchers, and staff affilated with Université Paris-Saclay, so please make sure to provide your institutional email account.

To prepare for your proofreading session, please bring any other information that maybe of use, ex. reviewer's comments. Please don't sent any documents in advance.

Note that writers are allowed 1 session per day, with a maximum of 16 sessions over the course of a term.

Cancellation policy: Sessions are automatically cancelled after 10 minutes of no-show. All no-shows will still be subtracted from the total number of hours per semester. 

We look forward to working with you soon!

 

Founded in 2019, the Academic Writing Center has been providing workshops and training courses in English for the entire teaching and research community of Université Paris-Saclay. The focus of all our courses is to guide researchers, from PhDs to senior faculty, towards better written and oral communication skills in English allowing them to have greater impact in international research communities.

All our courses are available online and in person, catering to both doctoral students and faculty.

  • If you are a PhD student, you will need to access the ADUM registration page to register for our courses.  
  • If you are a faculty member, please send an email to awc-registrations@centralesupelec.fr to register for our courses.

Writing training courses
Writing Skills in Science I – introduction to formal academic writing norms for publication purposes
Writing Skills in Science II – continuation into advanced techniques for effective academic English writing
Grant Writing – guide to preparing international grant applications in English
Postdoc Packet Preparation – guide to preparing an application packet for postdoctoral positions

Speaking workshops
Science Talks – practice, improve and become more at ease speaking about science in general
Public Speaking – prepare to give a formal presentation on stage at a conference
3MT® Competition – competition preparation for explaining a doctoral thesis to a non-specialist audience in three minutes.
Debating – weekly debates on various societal challenges in parliamentary debate format

Instructional design courses
Captivate – teach your course in English
Skill Up with SciComm – understand and be able to handle the codes, norms, and language of communications to share your research with non-experts

We hope you are able to find a course to suit your needs, and if not, please don't hesitate to contact us with any suggestions.

We look forward to seeing you soon!


Writing Skills in Science I

Description
Writing Skills in Science I is the first of two courses for writers who want to familiarize themselves with formal academic writing norms. Through this course, you will be introduced to the formal writing norms of academic English that will enable you to prepare your manuscript confidently and autonomously for publication as well as use the language that will engage readers increasing the number of citations.

Pre-requisites
This course requires a B1 English level, as well as the willingness to participate both written and orally in a group context.

Instructional design
Writing Skills in Science I is a 10-hour training course that uses task-based learning. Through examining practical examples and hands-on exercises, participants work on becoming more effective writers in academic English. Each session is a mixture of lecture and participative activities, with questions, discussions, and short writing exercises completed collaboratively.

Training Formats
This course exists in both a version for PhD students and a version for faculty members, and in multiple training formats, with 10 weekly 1-hour sessions (online) or 5 weekly 2-hour sessions (in-person).

Course Content
Understanding Reader-Writer Dynamics
Using Topic-Stress to Organize Your Message
Understanding When to Use Active Versus Passive Voice
Applying Cohesive Techniques Effectively
Recognizing the Importance of Formal Structures
Writing an Effective Abstract

Course Objectives
Introduction to linguistic mechanisms that enable clarity and legibility, and their application to scientific texts
Refinement of reading skills for a more thorough, critical linguistic analysis of any manuscript
Deeper insight into how English is used in scientific writing and publication
Understanding of the norms associated with English as a lingua franca for use in high-level exchanges in international contexts
Increased confidence in written communication for different audiences or publications
Knowledge of publication mechanisms at an international level
Development toward a more objective writing style when evaluating the research or proposals of others
Use of editorial conventions and methodology to write more effectively in academic English

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Use writing techniques that emphasize clarity and confidence, and that establish academic authority.
Employ techniques that allow you to write in a language that is accessible to different audiences and different types of publications
Apply the formal academic norms in scientific writing
Apply grammar techniques that improve readability
Increase your level of autonomy when writing in English
Use your knowledge of effective formal structures to give written feedback objectively
Submit formal publications using the editorial conventions and methodology from the course at the highest level of international research

Workload
10 hours of training in a synchronous format.
No asynchronous training required.

Course Instructors
Melissa Ann Thomas, lead instructor
Andrew Crawford
Calvin Peck

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Writing Skills in Science II

Description
This course is a continuation of Writing Skills in Science I. Using the concepts previously learned, we dive further into the techniques needed to take your academic writing to the next level. You will be pushed towards more autonomy in your analysis of different pieces of published texts, specifically focusing on the more linguistically complex aspects of writing for publication: the abstract and the introduction. In this course, we will challenge you with more analysis of writing style, more spontaneous editing, and more strategies for manipulating texts. This course will be more workshop-based than the introductory course, as participants will now have acquired the editorial conventions and methodology from Writing Skills in Science I.

Pre-requisites
Writing Skills in Science II requires that all participants have completed Writing Skills in Science 1. Participants must also have a B1 English level and a willingness to participate both written and orally in a group context.

Instructional design
This is a 10-hour training course that uses task-based learning. Through examining practical examples and hands-on exercises, participants work on advancing their skills as effective writers in academic English. Each session is a mixture of lecture and participative activities, with questions, discussions, and short writing exercises completed collaboratively.

Training Formats
This course exists in both a version for PhD students and a version for faculty members, and in multiple training formats, with 10 weekly 1-hour sessions (online) or 5 weekly 2-hour sessions (in-person).

Course Content
Refining the Use of Topic-Stress
Understanding When and How to Use Nominalizations
Writing an Effective and Concise Title
Identifying Circumlocutions and Their Impact on Writing
Advanced Use of Hedges, Strong Verbs, and Other Formal Structures
Introduction to Writing a Review Paper

Course Objectives
Confident application of the formal written academic English conventions gained in Writing Skills in Science I for scientific reports and communication
Identification of the possibilities for conceptual breakthroughs through a deeper understanding of the formal norms of academic English
Effective evaluation of the appropriate linguistic hierarchy for expressing concepts and ideas
Acquisition of the tools for communicating complex ideasvand for providing feedback structures more clearly in high-level exchanges in international contexts
Effective use of academic English for the expression of an understanding, perspective, and critical view of all available recent research and development
Further training in modifying written communication for different audiences or publications

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Apply more advanced formal academic norms in scientific writing to real-world examples
Use editorial conventions and methodology to identify and describe problematic writing
Apply advanced grammar techniques that improve readability and impact
Increase knowledge of the requirement for a clear writing style through specific domain-related benchmarking
Engage in the written reviewer feedback process more confidently
Critically evaluate publication quality
Employ cohesive techniques with confidence and ease for a more readable writing style

Workload
10 hours of training in a synchronous format.
No asynchronous training required.

Course Instructors
Melissa Ann Thomas, lead instructor
Andrew Crawford
Calvin Peck

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Grant Writing

Description
The Grant Writing course functions as a guided introduction to both searching for and writing scientific grants. This course is designed to reduce the mystery of finding and applying for international funding, specifically for European funding, that requires applications to be written in English. The course will focus on reading and interpreting the demands and conventions of specific applications, as well as how to adjust an academic writing style to fit specific formats of scientific grants.

Pre-requisites
Grant Writing requires a B1 English level, an interest in the topic and the willingness to participate both written and orally in a group and individual context.

Instructional Design
Grant Writing is a 10-hour project-based learning program. Participants will research grant offers and the language employed collectively and be guided individually to produce a professional quality grant proposal. Participants will write throughout the course and have a draft that is almost ready for submission at the end of it.  

Course Content  
Introduction to the Open4Research Paris Saclay grant proposal platform
Benchmarking existing grant offers  
Considering transfer issues related to enhancing the value of research  
Linking research practices to the specific demands of various sectors.
Identifying and choosing grants that match specialization, professional expertise, and career goals
Benchmarking language and written structures employed when writing a grant proposal
Prepare a draft of grant application content for individual consultation  
Revision of the grant application document at a professional level of quality for individual consultation

Course Objectives
Grant Writing will give participants the ability to research and respond professionally in English to grant proposals for their field of expertise. By learning to establish and solidify a strategy, participants will be able to search for and write grant proposals effectively and autonomously. The two individual consultations in the middle and the end of the course create a structured workflow to allow for participants to complete a grant proposal by the end of the course, while engaging in the benchmarking process that helps them understand the language norms in grant writing.  

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Knowledge of the availability and expectations of international academic grants  
A clear writing strategy on how to they approach the grant writing process
Exposure to different writing styles in the world of grants.  
Produced one page of a professional quality grant proposal in English.

Course Instructor
Calvin Peck

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Postdoc Packet Preparation

Description
Postdoc Packet Preparation is a five-hour workshop for doctoral students who have started to put together their application packet for a post-doctoral position. We provide information that demystifies a process that often varies from job posting to job posting, allowing you to put together a clear application that will help increase its impact. In addition to general advice on how to write a CV, cover letter, research plan, and request for a letter of recommendation, you will also benefit from 3 one-to-one sessions with the instructor. These sessions will guide you on how to effectively use formal written academic English norms to best present your circumstance to any search committee that receives your packet.

Pre-requisites
Postdoc Packet Preparation requires a B1 English level. Participants should also have completed at least a year of their doctoral program. To be validated for the course, participants must attend the three individual sessions.

Instructional Design
Postdoc Packet Preparation is a 5-hour workshop that uses task-based learning. The first two hours are lecture sessions. The remaining three hours are individual sessions guiding participants on how to apply various techniques of formal written academic English norms to improve the quality of an application.

Training Formats
This course exists in multiple training formats, with 1 2-hour lecture-based secion and 3 one-to-one 1-hour session.

Course Content
Methods of applying for positions
How to write a research plan
What to include in your CV
Whether you need to provide a cover letter
How to handle requesting a recommendation letter

Course Objectives
Introduction into the writing conventions for expressing solutions to complex and new problems, and expressing the most advanced knowledge and know-how required for each post
Development of the ability to adapt, draft, and formulate ideas and contributions in English for each job posting
Use of effective language to write a cover letter that highlights skills and how those skills connect to potential collaborators
Development of skills needed to communicate and promote advanced concepts and approaches to a diverse audience
Techniques for synthesizing past work, promoting current research, and proposing innovative ideas for future collaborations through having an understanding, perspective, and critical view of all available recent research and development.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Understand the importance of networking throughout their career and how this impacts the quality of their entire application packet
Apply various techniques based on formal written academic English norms that best present their application and that tailor each document to the requirements of a given job posting
Know how to prioritize content over design in an academic CV
Write a well-organized cover letter that is clear and complements the CV by using language that highlights strengths and achievements while being honest about shortcomings
Have a good understanding of the purpose of a letter of recommendation that will then inform who to ask and how to request one from them
Structure a research plan using language appropriate for a non-specialist audience while effectively promoting their ideas for the future

Workload
5 hours of guidance in a synchronous format.
Variable amount of asynchronous work required.

Course Instructors
Melissa Ann Thomas

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Science Talks

Description
Science Talks is a 10-hour workshop dedicated to scientific and societal topics. In a convivial and safe environment, practice speaking and debating in English about a variety of topics in the scientific domain.

Pre-requisites
Science Talks has no requirements apart from an interest in the topic and the willingness to participate orally in a group context.

Instructional Design
Science Talks is a 10-hour series of interactive workshops using real-world material as a springboard for discussion or working on a theme. Students will improve and achieve their objectives with active participation in the planned activities. Correction of specific language issues will be dealt with as appropriate.

Training Formats
This course exists in both a version for PhD students and a version for faculty members, and in multiple training formats, with 10 weekly 1-hour sessions offered either online or in-person.

Course Content
Round tables about big questions of our time
Meetings about specific scientific subjects
Interviewing some invited guests about their job
Presenting your scientific field
General conversation
Global goals for sustainable development
The Energy Crisis
Nutrition
Machine Learning and AI
Climate Change
Latest scientific theories and discoveries

Course Objectives
Science Talks gives participants the opportunity to practice and improve their English when talking about science in a relaxed environment. They will acquire the skills necessary to feel totally at ease when addressing someone in English either to discuss either their own or another science field in general.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Debate more confidently
Have general conversation
Interview someone about a scientific subject
Make a presentation
Defend their point of view
Agree/disagree diplomatically
Have an increased lexical vocabulary
Revise their grammar
Listen and read more efficiently

Workload
10 hours of training in a synchronous format.
No asynchronous training required.

Course Instructor
Andrew Crawford

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Public Speaking

Description
Public Speaking is a course that prepares you to go from script to stage in presenting your ideas to a wider community. Whether speaking to 5, 50, 500, or 5000 people, the basics of how you use your voice and design your content to be meaningful to your audience remain the same. Through this course, you will learn some of these basic techniques, while reviewing examples of their use by other public speakers and finding ways of adapting those techniques in meaningful ways to your own preparation.

Pre-requisites
Public Speaking has no requirements, apart from an interest in the topic and the willingness to participate orally in a group context.

Instructional Design
Public Speaking is a 10-hour course that uses task-based learning, where four of the ten sessions involve participants working in groups to produce content in real-time. Each session is participative - with questions, presentations, and feedback given collaboratively. The course has one lecture session at the beginning and end, and the rest is in either workshop or practice session format.

Course Content
Understanding your audience & their attention spans
Establishing and using a common thread in your talk
Storytelling for live audiences using facts and figures
Debating and persuasive speaking techniques; memorization techniques
Videoconferencing and interviewing online

Course Objectives
Public Speaking will initiate participants into the art of persuasion and prepare them to use the tools and techniques required to perform on stage and thus train their capacity to contribute to high-level exchanges in international contexts. Through lectures, workshops, and practical sessions, participants will test and prepare with these tools and adapt them meaningfully, while reporting and communicating in several languages on scientific and technological work to different audiences or publications, both in writing and orally.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Adapt discursive skills to research and innovation needs
Develop their capacities for dialogue using publications that contribute to new knowledge and know-how
Consider the impact of how research and innovation ideas are formulated while adapting them to diverse audiences
Report and communicate in English on scientific and technological work that impacts society
Assess and vary oral communication to impact diverse audiences
Use rhetorical, persuasive, and ceremonial language structures in a formal setting  

Course Instructor
Divya Madhavan

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition

Description
The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition is an internationally renowned competition that cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills, as well as their ability to perform on a stage. Through this course, students will be able to effectively explain the research of a doctoral thesis, in English, to a non-specialist audience in three minutes. Our training content not only develops the communication and presentation skills of each participant, but also provides a valuable opportunity for candidates to come together and talk about their research in English. This training course is open to all PhD students in their program's second or third year who intend to participate in the 3MT® competition.

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. For more information on the competition itself, visit https://threeminutethesis.uq.edu.au/

Pre-requisites
The 3MT® Competition training course requires that all participants have completed at least one year of their doctoral program. Participants must commit to participating in both the training course and the final. Participants must also have a B1 English level and a willingness to participate both written and orally in a group context.

Instructional Design
The 3MT® Competition is a 10-hour course training course uses task-based learning, where each of the 5 sessions involves a short lecture followed by several speaking activities. Each session is participative - with questions, presentations, and feedback given collaboratively. The last session is a mini competition where finalists are chosen to advance to the final.

Training Formats
This course only exists in the in-person format, with 5 weekly 2-hour sessions, 3 1-hour individual coaching sessions, and 2 hours of competition.

Course Content
Background and Rules of Competition
Judging a 3MT talk
Effective and Efficient Practicing
The importance of Script Writing
Pronunciation Techniques for Sounding More Natural
Using Rhetorical Devices in Presentations
How to Structure a Talk
Effective Presentation Language
How to Produce a Captivating PowerPoint Slide
Techniques for Recording and Submitting an Impactful Video

Course Objectives
Improvement of speaking skills in English, fostering effective exchanges and contributions in high-stakes international contexts. Ability to report and communicate in English on scientific and technological work with language that is adaptable to diverse audiences
Training in specific rhetorical, persuasive, and argumentative tools that help communication and promote advanced concepts and approaches
Familiarization with the judging rubric for the competition to inform how to best present a 3MT talk
Techniques for providing constructive feedback that develop skills in evaluating the work of others.
Engagement with other competitors in several exchanges, informing each other about current research advancements
Use of feedback to enhance the quality of a presentation
Development of the curiosity, adaptability, and openness necessary to build and maintain a high level of general and international culture.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Write an effective script for their 3MT talk
Develop academic, presentation, and research communication skills
Use concise and precise language to communicate their science to a non-expert audience
Be autonomous in practicing pronunciation techniques that increase fluid speaking
Apply techniques for reducing scientific jargon
Recognize and judge what makes a captivating talk
Record and submit a video conforming to competition rules
Effectively explain the research of a doctoral thesis, in English, to a non-specialist audience in three minutes

Workload
13 hours of training in a synchronous format.
2 hours of competition in a synchronous format.
Several hours of asynchronous training required.

Course Instructor
Melissa Ann Thomas

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Debating

Description
Debating is a dynamic and interactive course that trains your ability to formulate arguments, respond to verbal challenges and manipulate language to put forward your point of view as effectively as possible. Taught by CentraleSupélec’s debating coach, you will become familiar with the both the Paris style of debating and British Parliamentary debating. Through this course, you will practice writing under pressure, formulating sharp and concise arguments that can be delivered in a short timeframe, and engaging in rebuttals when your arguments are challenged. This course will challenge your speaking skills and your ability to interact spontaneously using complex ideas and language structures.

Pre-requisites
As Debating involves weekly debates in English, we recommend that participants have at least a B2 level to join the course.

Instructional Design
Debating is a 10-hour course and is performance-based, with role play (using parliamentary roles as in traditional government debates) as a means of structuring and appropriating content rapidly. Participants will quickly learn the efficiency of assuming a specific role in a public speaking setting, which will allow them to overcome inhibitions about speaking to an audience and focus on content and ideas. The inherent structures and mechanisms of persuasive speaking, which is the cornerstone of debating, will also become familiar to participants through weekly training.

Course Content
Introduction to international debating formats
Understanding the art of debate: arguments, points of information, rebuttals
Understanding roles and idea representation through argument sequencing
Weekly live debates on a variety of societal issues related to research development
Building an argument, breaking down an argument, fallacies
Scripting and memorization techniques
Rapid reading and synthesis techniques

Course Objectives
Debating will initiate participants into the art of debating, rhetoric and persuasion and thus train their capacity to contribute to high-level exchanges in international contexts in English. Through weekly debates that are prepared, scripted, and structured within standard debating formats, participants will be trained intensively in written and oral communication. This course will help participants gain confidence in speaking about a variety of societal, scientific, and technological issues to different audiences or publications.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Adapt their persuasive and discursive skills to international audiences
Develop their capacities for argument and synthesis using research themes that contribute to new knowledge
Consider the impact of how research, innovation and societal challenges are formulated while adapting them to diverse audiences
Report and communicate in English on scientific and technological work that impacts society
Assess and vary oral communication to impact diverse audiences
Use rhetorical, persuasive, and ceremonial language structures in a formal setting
 
Course Instructor
Divya Madhavan

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Captivate
 
Description
Captivate is a workshop series introducing you to the theory, practice, and instructional design of teaching disciplinary content in English. This workshop will help you redevelop your existing courses and create new ones using English as a medium of instruction. After following the workshop, you can benefit from ten individual coaching sessions to ensure the successful development of your teaching module. You can use the sessions according to your needs, be it for language or instructional design purposes.

Pre-requisites
Captivate has no requirements apart from an interest in the topic and the willingness to participate orally in a group context.

Instructional Design
This 8-hour workshop is hands-on. Participants produce content in real-time. Each session is participative, with questions, presentations, and feedback given collaboratively. Some activities involve group work, others individual work. Participants get to share ideas, teaching practices and resources.

Language purposes may include improving course scripts, addressing any language aspects you do not feel comfortable with, rehearsing your course and improving your pronunciation.  

Instructional design purposes may include understanding the modified classroom space when teaching in English in a non-English speaking country, focusing on materials and curriculum design to increase your impact as a teacher, and creating student-focused learning environments using appropriate Edtech tools most meaningful in the post-covid teaching landscape.    

Course Content
Teaching in an EMI (English as a Medium of Instruction) context
Language use in the classroom
Dividing a course into digestible chunks
Storytelling and other techniques to engage students
Visuals to enhance teaching and learning
Present a chunk of a course
Assessing a course and giving feedback

Course Objectives
In this workshop, you will practice teaching concepts, tools, and methods to diverse audiences using English as a medium of instruction and effective instructional design. Whether you speak English as a first, second, or other language, the reality of teaching in higher education in English today poses specific communicative constraints that this course will address. Together, we will reflect on adapting content to a diverse and intercultural audience, understanding the switching of codes that these environments demand, communicating and teaching advanced concepts and approaches, and for those who do not speak English as a first language, overcoming fears linked to using English when teaching.

Captivate will allow you to try and practice teaching strategies and tools you may not have used regularly and effectively as well as experiment, within a safe space, with out-of-the-box styles that you might have encountered. The goal is to create a student-centered interactive course that anticipates the difficulties that may arise from a group of students from different educational backgrounds and cultures, using teaching technologies as effectively as possible.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Design and deliver a small section of a course
Practice teaching strategies such as building and narrative arc and storytelling
Prepare interactive activities that will allow students to process the information taught
Reacting and responding to the challenges of the classroom space in real time
Use tools to interact with the students
Design visual aids that will enhance learning and overcome language barriers
Assess and give feedback

Course Instructor
Daniella Luca

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Skill Up with SciComm

Description
Skill Up with SciComm is a course that prepares you for the complex world of contemporary science communication for audiences beyond your immediate domain. In this course, you will learn the communication norms and styles of a variety of media forms: from posters and flyers to podcasts and videos via social media. Through specific exercises, demonstrations, and case studies, you will train your ability to adapt your written and oral communication to be more effective across these different types of media.

Pre-requisites
Skill Up with SciComm has no requirements, apart from an interest in the topic and the willingness to participate orally in a group context.

Instructional Design
Skill Up with SciComm is a 15-hour training module, which uses task-based learning, where participants work in groups to produce content in real-time. Each session is participative- with questions, presentations, and feedback given collaboratively. The course has one lecture session at the beginning and end, and the rest is in either workshop or practice session format.   

Course Content
Communicative media culture in the sciences
Storytelling and narrative in a variety of media structures
Design principles in posters and flyers
Voice and lighting principles in recorded media
Social media adaptations for scientific content
Designing a talk show

Course Objectives
Skill Up with SciComm provides training in various media and tools to disseminate research development and scientific culture, and thus trains participants’ capacity to contribute to high-level exchanges in international contexts. Through case studies, brainstorming sessions, and a design bootcamp, participants will be trained to think on their feet and produce communications materials under time constraints. The course also contributes to having an understanding, perspective, and critical view of all available recent research and development.

Skills & Learning Outcomes
Examine their discipline to assess how scientific information is produced and how it is communicated to a general audience
Identify a theme of interest to communicate and build scientific content based on this theme in their research field
Qualify different target audiences (expectations, level of competence) to adapt their scientific content and develop appropriate communication strategies
Use communication tools & techniques to share your scientific content and create engagement opportunities tailored to the general public
Participate in the dissemination of scientific culture to the general audience
Produce a narrative and visual aid (book cover, poster, flyer) of scientific outreach based on their research theme

Course Instructors
Divya Madhavan and Aurelie Thomann

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Divya MADHAVAN, Founder & Director
I am the Director of the Department of Languages and Cultures at CentraleSupélec, where I also founded the Academic Writing Center, which caters to the doctoral and research communities. I’m a graduate of the universities of Warwick, London, and Exeter and am also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. My teaching portfolio is specialized around storytelling, Sci-Comm and public speaking; public speaking is especially close to my heart as I am CentraleSupélec’s debating coach for intervarsity debating tournaments. I’ve trained teachers and worked with scientific writers across the world for over 20 years and what I love about being at the AWC is having the freedom to create professional development that is truly meaningful and useful in academia today. I have so much fun bringing good science and good communication closer together in my job every day.   

Daniella LUCA, Language Coach
I am an educator and language coach with over 20 years of experience. As a language coach at CentraleSupélec, I help staff improve their working application of English. I am also a Language Teacher at the Academic Writing Centre, where I design and deliver workshops for faculty members and PhD students. I have a Master’s degree in Educational Sciences and Modern Languages from the University of Messina, Italy. After graduating in 2001, I worked in various professional and academic settings, teaching English to corporate clients and senior professionals in France, high school and university students in Spain and Chinese government officials in the UK. Passionate about the science of education and the growing potential of digital technologies to enhance learning, in 2018 I obtained a Master’s in Digital Learning from the University of Nanterre, France. I love creating customized educational resources, designing courses for a wide range of learners, and delivering them in a variety of formats, from blended to entirely online.
Melissa Ann THOMAS, Language Coach
I have been an English teacher in France since 2008, joining the Academic Writing Center in 2021. I’ve taught at Lycée Chevolier (Angers), Université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand), and various associations around Paris, as well as schools outside of France, in Guatemala and Taiwan. Before my life in France, I attended the University of Washington, where I studied both Astronomy (peculiar RR Lyrae, supernovae type 1a, and extrasolar planet search) and Speech and Hearing Sciences. As a graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh, I continued my studies in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department. Throughout my academic experience, my research projects have focused on language learning, using techniques such as point-light displays, event-related brain potential, eye tracking, virtual worlds, and fMRI. My ultimate goal as an AWC language coach is to give authors not only the tools to become better writers, but to also have them take joy in shaping their words for more efficient scientific communication.
 

Andrew Crawford, Language Coach

I am an English language coach with over ten years experience in education. Having arrived in France in 2012 I have provided language training to people in various industries, including marketing, finance, legal and manufacturing. Prior to moving into the education sector, I spent 8 years working in the financial services industry in the UK following my graduation from Coventry University with a B.A Hons degree in Business Enterprise in 2002. Given the global challenges now faced, from fighting climate change to dealing with possible future pandemics, we need collective global expertise. I am passionate about helping the scientifc community here at Université Paris Saclay improve their written English so that they have the tools neccessary to contribute more easily with the global scientific community ; enabling deeper global collaboration for finding the solutions to the problems.


Calvin PECK, Consultant
I hold a Ph.D. in Music Theory from the University of Indiana-Bloomington. During my doctorate, I earned several grants that funded archival research for my thesis as well as for international conferences. I have over a decade of experience as a university instructor, in which I have trained students from all countries of the world on the nuances of academic and professional English conventions. Although my knowledge of 11th-century acoustic theory and molecular gastronomy may seem important, I hope to instead use my more significant experiences in academic settings to the benefit of the community of Université Paris-Saclay.

 

 

Alexandra Cormier, Adminsitrative Assistant
 

Come and meet us!

Academic Writing Center
CentraleSupélec, Université Paris-Saclay
9 rue Joliot-Curie
Bâtiment Bouygues
91190 Gif-sur-Yvette

Located on the second floor of Bouygues, section e2, Direction de la recherche, in offices sa201 and sa204
 

 

For more information, contact our administrative assistant:
Alexandra Cormier
Office e.257
alexandra.cormier@centralesupelec.fr

Hope to see you soon!

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2.1670532226563  48.70999407173